Safe

Group violence

Has your friend been a victim of group violence?

It is upsetting to see a friend attacked or in trouble. You are doing the right thing by looking for help.

They will need support because victims are often:

  • frightened to report the attack
  • scared to ask for help
  • not willing to have hospital treatment

What can you do?

First, if they were attacked, you should make sure they have been to hospital or seen a doctor:

  • head wounds can be very serious
  • if there is no blood, it could still be very serious
  • damage to the inside of the body can sometimes be life threatening; it's important your friend gets checked out just in case they have an injury that they can't see but needs treating

You need to encourage your friend to talk to someone about it. This can be frightening for them, so don't push too hard. Your friend should:

  • talk to their parents or a responsible adult
  • talk to their teacher
  • go to the nearest police station, or speak to their Safer Schools Officer or local a Safer Neighbourhoods Team - if it's an emergency they should call 999
  • if they feel unable to talk to the police, they can call the Crimestoppers charity anonymously on 0800 555 111 (they won't have to give their name and their call will not be traced)

If they don't want to talk to anyone, you can still help by reporting it for them. It might feel like you're doing something behind their back, but for their safety it must be reported. Even if you don't know who attacked your friend, there are still things that you can do to help. Try:

  • contacting your local police station, Safer Schools Officer or local a Safer Neighbourhoods Team as before
  • reporting a crime online by visiting the ‘Reporting crime’ section on the Metropolitan Police website (you can also click to our ‘How to contact us’ page on this site)
  • or if you don't want to talk to the police you can call the Crimestoppers charity anonymously on 0800 555 111 (they will not ask your name, and your call will not be traced)

You might also want to read

For more information about group violence visit our ‘More help and advice’ page. Or for other related topics, take a look at our sections on bullying and knife and gun crime.

Group violence