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Terrorist or extremist activity

Terrorism, violent extremism and the law

Any form of violence has a serious impact on victims and should not be tolerated, no matter where it takes place, or who's doing it. Terrorism and violent extremism is against the law, which means that anybody engaging in terrorist activity must be arrested and sent to court to be tried.

Terrorism can strike at the heart of any community and damage many, many lives.

What are the police doing to protect people from terrorism?

Public safety is of utmost importance and remains our priority, so we take terrorism and terrorist threats very seriously.

How we prevent and deal with acts of terrorism remains under constant review. This means we work closely with other organisations to protect the public such as central and local government, the emergency services and the British Security Service.

We constantly review how we police London, including where and when we send police officers to patrol the city.

  • We are trying to stop people from becoming or supporting violent extremists or terrorists in the first place.
  • We are working with many other organisations to help vulnerable people so that they are not lead into a life of violence.
  • We are also addressing some of the reasons why people turn to violent extremism.
  • We are helping and supporting victims of 'hate crime' while making sure that people who commit crimes that are motivated by hatred of someone's race, religion or disability are arrested and put before the courts.

Terrorism can lead to some of the largest prison sentences that can be handed out in the UK, including life imprisonment. Between 2013 and 2014, 57 people were convicted of charges relating to terrorism and were jailed for 271 years in total.

Find out more and read our frequently asked questions on terrorism and violent extremism on the main Metropolitan Police site.

What next?

If you are worried about any issues relating to terrorism and violent extremism, there is help and support available. Visit our ‘More help and advice’ page.

Terrorism or violent extremism